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butterfly facts-Butterflies cannot fly if their body temperature is less than 86 degrees.

Posted by aakarsha handa on January 20, 2011 at 6:05 AM

hey !!

i am sorry for writing this blog so late!! well today's fact is that butterflies cannot fly if their body temperature is l;ess than 86 degrees!!

Since butterflies are cold blooded ,they do not produce metabolic heat like humans. so it is necessary for them to warm up their flight muscles. This is done by basking in the sun in order to absorb heat.Most butterflies need temperatures of at least 60-65 degrees to fly.

now let us also know about metabolism.

Metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that happen in living organisms to maintain life. These processes allow organisms to grow and reproduce, maintain their structures, and respond to their environments.

warm blooded animals can keep their body temperature at a roughly constant level, regardless of the ambient temperature. This involves the ability to cool down or produce more body heat. Warm-blooded animals mainly control their body temperature by regulating their metabolic rates, such as increasing their metabolic rate as the ambient temperature begins to decrease.

but since butterfly is a cold blooded insect , therefore it does not release metabolic heat to respond to the environment.thats why they require basking in the sun to fly.

that is all for today!!!we will track on some more interseting facts in our next blog!!

till then

regards

aakarsha 

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6 Comments

Reply Angelina
7:50 AM on April 10, 2011 
My butterfly is in perfect condision he just can't fly and he looks great but nothing is wrong with his wings
Reply aakarsha handa
9:52 PM on April 6, 2011 
hi julian
well , i have used the references for this information.i searched the google and found this on many of the websites.i will be able to tell you from where had i found this , the exact websites , but not know.i will have to check them.
Reply julian wang
12:14 PM on April 6, 2011 
Hi aakasha,

You information is really important for my research. Could you let me know how you got these, from references or your study? I am trying to use your understanding but need a reference. Thanks,

Julian

aakarsha handa says...
hello mam
i have finally found out something helpful that wud help to sole your problem to some extent.
Butterflies' bodies work best at an internal temperature of about 82 degrees Fahrenheit (28 degrees Celsius). Butterflies can't move their wing muscles at all if they get too cold, which means they can't look for food or flee from predators.Unlike mammals, which can usually keep their temperature steady in all but extreme temperatures, butterflies have to use their surroundings to manage their body heat. At night, butterflies roost, or take shelter, to protect themselves from the drop in temperature, but daytime is a different story.During the day , butterflies bask in the sun with their wings open to catch the warmth from the sun. In chillier temperatures, butterflies can also use their wings as reflectors, opening them partially to focus the sunlight onto their thorax, where their wing muscles attach. Sometimes, butterflies will rest on warm rocks to soak up the heat from underneath. If the weather gets too warm, a butterfly may fold its wings flat and arrange itself so the sun hits the narrow edge of its wings rather than the broad side.

Sometimes, the sun doesn't provide enough warmth to get a butterfly moving. When this happens, the butterfly can move its wings in tiny increments in each direction, gradually warming the muscles. This movement is a lot like how your body shivers in cold weather to keep you warm. Eventually, the butterfly's muscles warm up, and it's able to fly.

A butterfly doesn't get to stop worrying about temperature once it's in the air. Butterflies' bodies get colder as cool breezes move over them, just like a hot spoonful of soup cools off if you blow over its surface. This is why butterflies often fly in short, rapid bursts on very cool days. A butterfly will warm itself until it's ready to fly, move quickly to the next flower or basking spot, and begin warming itself again.
Reply aakarsha handa
12:51 PM on February 3, 2011 
hello mam
i have finally found out something helpful that wud help to sole your problem to some extent.
Butterflies' bodies work best at an internal temperature of about 82 degrees Fahrenheit (28 degrees Celsius). Butterflies can't move their wing muscles at all if they get too cold, which means they can't look for food or flee from predators.Unlike mammals, which can usually keep their temperature steady in all but extreme temperatures, butterflies have to use their surroundings to manage their body heat. At night, butterflies roost, or take shelter, to protect themselves from the drop in temperature, but daytime is a different story.During the day , butterflies bask in the sun with their wings open to catch the warmth from the sun. In chillier temperatures, butterflies can also use their wings as reflectors, opening them partially to focus the sunlight onto their thorax, where their wing muscles attach. Sometimes, butterflies will rest on warm rocks to soak up the heat from underneath. If the weather gets too warm, a butterfly may fold its wings flat and arrange itself so the sun hits the narrow edge of its wings rather than the broad side.

Sometimes, the sun doesn't provide enough warmth to get a butterfly moving. When this happens, the butterfly can move its wings in tiny increments in each direction, gradually warming the muscles. This movement is a lot like how your body shivers in cold weather to keep you warm. Eventually, the butterfly's muscles warm up, and it's able to fly.

A butterfly doesn't get to stop worrying about temperature once it's in the air. Butterflies' bodies get colder as cool breezes move over them, just like a hot spoonful of soup cools off if you blow over its surface. This is why butterflies often fly in short, rapid bursts on very cool days. A butterfly will warm itself until it's ready to fly, move quickly to the next flower or basking spot, and begin warming itself again.
Reply aakarsha handa
10:58 AM on January 23, 2011 
hello mam
i wud surely woek out on this and tell u as soon as possible!!!
Edith Flores Wolff says...
You always provide us with something new. Aakarsh. Thanks a lot. The big question here about butterfly's body temperature. What happens if the sun doesn't come out for days. What could happen then? Could you please research on the relationship between sun and butterfly reproduction? That would be great.
Reply Edith Flores Wolff
4:20 AM on January 23, 2011 
You always provide us with something new. Aakarsh. Thanks a lot. The big question here about butterfly's body temperature. What happens if the sun doesn't come out for days. What could happen then? Could you please research on the relationship between sun and butterfly reproduction? That would be great.